For a fleeting instant, Harry thought
he saw a gleam of something like
triumph in Dumbledore's eyes.

I want to like things again.

 

meminissejuvabit:

So I want to be excited. And I am excited. But also a part of me is terrified that it’s just not going to be as good as I want it to be. 

Same. There’s a lot of throwbacks, which is awesome for us fans, but it looks like Veronica’s life has moved on so much that making it all come back to where we left off might feel too forced and stop the actual plot from being as interesting.

But we’ll see! I’m definitely excited and it looks like it could be good. And no way it can be worse than Arrested Development Season 4. (I’m sure to finish this one!)

(Source: veronicamarsnews)

megachiropteran:

today in laura’s priorities are immensely fucked up — i spend the day exhausted and near-tears, therapist urges me to consider reducing my workload, so naturally i come online and see a job posting about being paid as an independent contractor for editing scientific papers for non-native English speaking writers & consider applying.

WHAT IS WRONG WITH ME

WELL, THAT SOUNDS LIKE A GREAT OPPORTUNITY that you should let yourself miss out on. You’re already in the middle of a great Purdue PhD opportunity! You don’t have to do all the things. And you might enjoy some of the things more if you did less of other things!

bonesoflight:

I’ve been wavering back and forth on if quitting my job is REALLY the right thing, because I’m so anxious about Matt and I losing out on that much income.

But considering I’m sitting here choking back tears/trying not to panic while getting ready for today, yeah, it’s the right fucking thing to do. Ugh.

I’m really bad at quitting things, so I didn’t quit my job where I felt unsafe until I found a new one a year later. Had I quit, I wouldn’t be sitting here regretting it now, that much I know. The fact that it made me miserable mattered. So even though I get the financial worry, it sounds like you made the right choice for you. Good luck finding an awesome new job (that you won’t have to weigh your personal safety and well-being against!)

deslizamiento:

Clearly Starbuck was a Taurus.

Hahaha, definitely.
Also, the Virgo one is totally accurate for me. Not that I put much (or any) stock in horoscopes, but it definitely solidifies my belief that I’m a Hufflepuff.

deslizamiento:

Clearly Starbuck was a Taurus.

Hahaha, definitely.

Also, the Virgo one is totally accurate for me. Not that I put much (or any) stock in horoscopes, but it definitely solidifies my belief that I’m a Hufflepuff.

(Source: shitthesignssay)

Adventures of a Girl Janitor: goldenheartedrose: gleamoftriumph: Blaaargh. I would like to go into...

karalianne:

goldenheartedrose:

karalianne:

girljanitor:

goldenheartedrose:

goldenheartedrose:

gleamoftriumph:

Blaaargh. I would like to go into Applied Behavior Analysis, but I don’t want there to be an expectation of teaching autistic kids to not stim. Nor for there to be a focus on appearing not autistic. I don’t think those have to be a part of ABA, but…

Breaking down the system from the inside. Mwahaha.

Someone always has to start it, you know? And a lot of the time, it starts with just trying to survive, and you end up chewing a hole in the universe for you and people like you to exist in.

Rather than doing away with ABA, change what ABA is.

I like it.

It’s hard to do.

And people burn out trying to do it.

Not saying don’t try, just saying that’s what happened to me.

That’s true. People do. It’s the main reason I’m not currently a teacher. Burnout is a big problem and it’s harder for non-NT people sometimes, specifically with this, because it matters on a personal level.

Yes. And.

I had dreams. Ideas. Things I wanted to make happen.

Now they’re happening in my novels instead of in my actual life, because there is no way I can go back to working in that field.

And I still would like to do something similar with ADHD, on a smaller scale than the dreams I had 10-15 years ago, but I worry about burnout with that, too.

Sometimes just living my own dang life burns me out.

Yes! The idealist in me loves the idea that I could help to bring positive change to the way it’s done overall (and I am neurotypical, so all the ideas swimming around my head about what needs to be changed are criticisms I’ve read by autistic folks) and wants to believe that, at the very least, I could find a place in that world and implement ABA in all the most ethical ways.

But I could also easily foresee it being too big an obstacle for me (for example, I don’t particularly think I have strong entrepreneurial skills that would help me to pave my own path) and not finding a place and being overcome by burnout trying. And not that I don’t think it’s worth trying! But I might be able to make a comparatively substantial difference without the extra burnout if I pursue a similar career (e.g special education teacher, or possibly SLP or OT.)

Still haven’t decided yet, though!

Blaaargh. I would like to go into Applied Behavior Analysis, but I don’t want there to be an expectation of teaching autistic kids to not stim. Nor for there to be a focus on appearing not autistic. I don’t think those have to be a part of ABA, but I don’t think that anyone can give me the guarantee I’m seeking, that I won’t have to face that obstacle with school, companies, or parents.

I sold my blood plasma today for $55. Sometimes donating makes me feel productive and efficient because it’s a fairly easy way to make money to supplement my income, and it’s pretty hard for me to find other opportunities to do that. But sometimes I go and feel like my soul is being sucked out of me along with my blood. Only poor people sell their blood. It’s a flexible and fairly small time commitment and the only consequence I’ll likely face is a flat scar inside my elbow (which didn’t really bother me until I started getting a small bump at the injection site, at which point I started questioning if I was undervaluing my body and my appearance.)

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Princeton University psychologist Susan Fiske took brain scans of heterosexual men while they looked at sexualised images of women wearing bikinis. She found that the part of their brains that became activated was pre-motor - areas that usually light up when people anticipate using tools. The men were reacting to the images as if the women were objects they were going to act on. Particularly shocking was the discovery that the participants who scored highest on tests of hostile sexism were those most likely to deactivate the part of the brain that considers other people’s intentions (the medial prefrontal cortex) while looking at the pictures. These men were responding to images of the women as if they were non-human.

The Equality Illusion (via lesilencieux)

This is why media matters. JFC.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2009/feb/16/sex-object-photograph

(Source: thoughtfulcynic)